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Raymond pair charged in 'fries extra crispy' drug deal at Burger King waive arraignment

By JASON SCHREIBER
Union Leader Correspondent

February 22. 2017 10:43AM
Garrett Norris, left, and Meagan Dearborn 



BRENTWOOD — Two Raymond residents charged in an alleged drive-thru drug operation while working at the Epping Burger King waived arraignment Wednesday and remain free on bail.

Meagan Dearborn, 19, and Garrett Norris, 21, face felony charges after their arrests in an undercover police operation on Jan. 21 at the fast food restaurant.

According to police, the drug operation used a “fries extra crispy” code when they were working to indicate a drug order.

Norris is charged with sale of controlled drug for allegedly selling marijuana through the drive-thru.

He’s also charged with possession of controlled drug with intent to distribute after police allegedly found him with less than 2 ounces of marijuana on the night of his arrest.

Dearborn is charged with conspiracy for allegedly agreeing with Norris to sell marijuana from the restaurant’s drive-thru window.

Neither could enter pleas in Brentwood circuit court because the charges are felonies.

However, Dearborn pleaded not guilty to a violation-level charge of unlawful possession of alcohol because she’s underage and allegedly was found with a Twisted Tea when arrested.

A trial management conference is scheduled for May 17 in Dearborn’s case.

Norris is due back in court March 1 for a probable cause hearing.

According to court paperwork, Norris is a student at Plymouth State University.

The police drug sting was conducted by Epping police and the Rockingham County Drug Task Force, with assistance from the Rockingham County Attorney’s Office.

According to Epping police, investigators learned that buyers would pull up to the drive-thru speaker and ask if “nasty boy” was working. Wallace said “nasty boy” referred to Norris.

If he was there, they would order their meal and ask for “fries, extra crispy,” which was the code for a marijuana sale, police said.

In an interview with the New Hampshire Union Leader after her arrest, Dearborn denied she knew anything about drugs being sold at the drive-thru.

“I didn’t know what was going on, but since I took the order and gave them the food they charged me,” she told the paper at the time.

jschreiber@newstote.com


Crime Raymond Epping


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