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March nor'easterThe nor'easter moved into New England on Friday, March 2, 2018, snapping trees, downing wires and killing at least seven people. The following day, some 1.8 million customers remained without power throughout the eastern United States, and communities on the New England coast faced more flooding.

Drivers navigate Hampton's flooded streets during the storm Friday. (Jason Schreiber/Sunday News Correspondent)
Hampton Beach resident Andy Kyriazis bought packages containing sandbags that he planned to place around his Island Path residence before the nor'easter that hit Friday, March 2, 2018. (Jason Schreiber/Union Leader Correspondent)
Hampton Beach resident Margie Ziemba holds up the special parking placard she received from the town of Hampton to use during flooding events. (Jason Schreiber/Union Leader Correspondent)
Lina, 4, left, and her sister Maude Hartwell, both of Franklin, look out at the bad weather on Friday, March 2, 2018, at River Guild Holistic Health Collaborative in Concord. (Allegra Boverman/Union Leader)
Lina, 4, left, and her sister Maude Hartwell, both of Franklin, look out at the bad weather on Friday, March 2, 2018, at River Guild Holistic Health Collaborative in Concord. (Allegra Boverman/Union Leader)
A pedestrian on Elm Street in Manchester battles his collapsing umbrella during the blustery nor'easter weather Friday, March 2, 2018. (Bruce Taylor/Union Leader)
Floodwaters made for some tough travel in Hampton during the morning's high tide on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Jason Schreiber/Union Leader Correspondent)
A truck moves through the water near South Hampton Beach Saturday, March 3, 2018. (Nicole Goodhue Boyd/Union Leader)
Ed Dudek of Hampton inspects his home Saturday, March 3, 2018, outside his Winnacunnet Road home. He has lived there for 42 years. He feels the water is the highest since the blizzard of 1978. He said it is to be expected if you live in New England.  (Nicole Goodhue Boyd/Union Leader)
Kendra Duvall and her uncle Stan Bocko review the remains of their family's cabana Saturday, March 3, 2018, on Route 1A. At 11 a.m., just before high tide, they were boarding up, but they left when it became too dangerous. (Nicole Goodhue Boyd/Union Leader)
Kendra Duvall and her uncle, Stan Bocko, hold up a painting of Peter Fuller, the son of a former governor of Massachusetts, as they search through the remains of her family's beachside cabana in North Hampton on Saturday. At 11 a.m., just before high tide, they were boarding up, but they left when it became too dangerous. (Nicole Goodhue Boyd/Union Leader)
A backhoe moves sand back to the beach and off the road Saturday, March 3, 2018, at Hampton Beach. (Nicole Goodhue Boyd/Union Leader)
University of New Hampshire students Gillian Murphy, Alexa Estrada and Elana Goldstein have fun in the wind Saturday, March 3, 2018, as they walk at Hampton Beach. (Nicole Goodhue Boyd/Union Leader)
Mark Lane carries his daughter Emma, 13. His son Eric snaps a few photos as they cross a flooded Winnacunnet Road in Hampton on Saturday, March 3, 2018, on their way back from looking at the beach. (Nicole Goodhue Boyd/Union Leader)
A family walks through the water on Winnacunnet Road in Hampton on Saturday, March 3, 2018. (Nicole Goodhue Boyd/Union Leader)
A sign near Route 1A tells drivers to go slowly. (Nicole Goodhue Boyd/Union Leader)
Rocks covered Route 1A across from North Hampton State Beach on Saturday, March 3, 2018. They had been there since Friday night's high tide. (Nicole Goodhue Boyd/Union Leader)