action:article | category:SPORTS26 | adString:SPORTS26 | zoneID:40

Home » Sports » Olympics

February 21. 2014 10:11PM

Shiffrin makes history with slalom win


Mikaela Shiffrin of the U.S. skis during the second run of the women's alpine skiing slalom event at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics at the Rosa Khutor Alpine Center. (REUTERS/Ruben Sprich)

KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia — She was slow — slow-twisting down the women’s slalom course with a big lead when suddenly, as if struck by some unseen reflex mallet, Mikaela Shiffrin’s left leg shot skyward.

“I thought it was over,” said U.S. women’s slalom coach Roland Pfeifer.

Shiffrin, whose family lived in Lyme, N.H., from 2003 to 2008, said she’d envisioned such a spill before arriving here to best prepare for that possibility, somehow not only regained her balance but her pace and the rhythm crucial for maneuvering swiftly through the series of gates.

“That was scary,” she said. “I thought I was going off the course.”

Seconds later, crouched low over skis, Shiffrin sailed over the finish line to become, at 18, the youngest slalom winner in Olympic history.

Ironically, her hair-raising victory came at the expense of her skiing idol. Austria’s Marlies Schild, whose 35 World Cup slalom wins are the most in history, held the two-run lead until Shiffrin’s second trip down the Rosa Khutor Alpine Center course.

Schild, 32, took the silver medal and her countrywoman, Kathrin Zettel, the bronze in the final women’s Alpine event of these 2014 Winter Olympics.

“I didn’t lose the gold medal,” said Schild. “I won silver in the second run. My dream died in the first run down.”

With her win, the precocious Shiffrin put herself in position to come to the 2018 Games in South Korea as one of the American ski team’s best-known names.

Shiffrin, who became the youngest skier to win a World Championship in 2013 and led the World Cup standings in the event this season, lost time in the near-fall. But the 0.49-second lead she had on the field after the morning run gave her plenty of cushion.

Her combined time of 1:44.54 was 0.53 ahead of Schild’s, 0.81 in front of Zettel.

“That (the near-fall) was a pretty crazy moment there,” said Shiffrin, now living in Eagle-Vail, Colo. “I was like, ‘I’m not going to make it. I’m not going to make it.’ I threw on a hockey stop right there. That was a little bit tough. It scared me half to death.”

By winning her pet event, Shiffrin also became the first U.S. gold medal-winner in the slalom since Barbara Cochran in 1972.

Before the race, the extremely confident teenager had counseled her coach not to worry.

“I’m going to win this thing,” she told Pfeifer. “I’m going to do the same thing Ted Ligety (the giant slalom gold-medalist) did. I’m the world champion and I’m going to do it.”

She was true to her word in the morning run, her time of 52.62 providing her with a sizable lead over her most dangerous competitions.

Skiing just before the winner on a rare cold night in the Caucasus, veterans Maria Hoefl-Reisch and Tina Maze couldn’t get it going during their final run.

Shiffrin was 1.34 seconds up on then-leader Schild when, to the sound of clanging cowbells, horns and screams, she jumped out of the chute-like gate.

Rocking back and forth rhythmically, as if she were engaged in a twist contest, Shiffrin looked in full-control early.

“I felt like I was really charging out of the start and had a good speed going,” she said. “That always makes me feel more comfortable on my feet. I thought the most fun part of the course was coming up, five gates really tight. You’re basically wiggling your feet back and forth. It’s really fun.”

That reverie was interrupted midway down when she caught the edge and her leg shot up.

“It was a crazy moment,” she said.

Before that run, her mother, an ex-ski racer, had told her to relax.

“I told her, ‘You don’t have to be 100 percent but don’t make any big mistakes,’ “ said Ellen Shiffrin. “Fortunately, she regrouped so well.”

In the typically chaotic aftermath of an Olympic event, Shiffrin appeared calmer than her mother, her coach and virtually everyone else.

“This is why we’re all here, isn’t it?” she said. “I wish I could have an American flag on my back at every World Cup race because that’s an amazing feeling to know you’re representing not just yourself or your team or your family but your entire country.”

.

Julia Ford, of Holderness, finished 24th in the event. It was her first Olympic effort.


 NH Sports Angle more
Links to news and happenings around the world of sports with a Granite State connection, updated daily.

Mo'ne Davis, and why no one should laugh at the idea of a woman in Major League Baseball

Curt Schilling says smokeless tobacco caused oral cancer

Bill Belichick: Eagles joint practices as productive as any

Big Knockout Boxing has grown from NH debut to Las Vegas attraction

Toronto Blue Jays Minor League System: Philosophy change?

Spring trial likely for former UNH women's hockey coach

Special golf cart helping Vietnam veteran play game he loves article

And so it begins: Equipment distribution starts a new era in Plymouth football

Tailgating changes for UNH football games

Report: Pirates' pitcher Jeff Locke cleared in gambling probe involving childhood friend from Conway

Tim OSullivan: Even with NFL success, NHs Kelly remembers his roots

Chip Kelly: 'Put some Galoshes on and go play'

Survey says Duke the most hated college hoops team in NH

Cheyenne Woods, Tiger's niece, trying to make big time article

Gorham papermill owner Lynn Tilton is getting Yale tennis award

Ex-bank president co-authors racing book

New England Patriots are the most hated NFL team in the world

Travis Hughes: It's time to drastically overhaul minor league hockey in North America

Portsmouth native, 47, conquers 21-mile swim of the English Channel

Bennett to take control of the flags for Granite State Pro Stock Series

Air Force captain serving in NH honored before Red Sox-Yankees crowd at Fenway

Newmarket woman second to run solo across the U.S.

VIDEO: A car's-eye view of the demolition derby at Cheshire County Fair

With NASCAR's $8.2B TV deal, nobody wants to be at back of pack

Kelly tinkers with Philadelphia offense

MORE

 New Hampshire Events Calendar
    

    SHARE EVENTS FOR PUBLICATION, IT'S FREE!

Upcoming Events

 New Hampshire Business Directory

  

    ADD YOUR BUSINESS TODAY!