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Compensation for Manchester police officer shot in 2012 under consideration

Staff Report
December 01. 2014 8:03PM




CONCORD — Gov. Maggie Hassan and the Executive Council will consider approving $125,000 in additional workers’ compensation benefits for a Manchester police officer who was shot multiple times in the line of duty in 2012.

The state Department of Labor is requesting authorization Wednesday to disburse that amount to Officer Daniel Doherty as compensation for “permanent loss of use of internal organs at less than 100 percent.”

Doherty suffered multiple bullet wounds to his torso and to his left leg on March 21, 2012.

He was paid workers’ compensation benefits pursuant to state law, but he could not be compensated for his internal injuries under the statute at the time, according to the Department of Labor.

A “First Responders Critical Injury Fund” established as part of the law in 2014 provides for additional compensation for critical internal injuries for any Group II retirement system member, such as Doherty.

His attorney, Mark Morrissette, submitted a petition on Sept. 23 to seek the additional compensation for the permanent loss or impairment of internal organs.

The Department of Labor reviewed the petition and medical record and concluded that Doherty sustained critical internal injuries to his bladder and his colon, which is covered under the law.

“Officer Doherty is entitled to the sum of $98,870 for each internal organ or a total of $185,740, which would be capped at the statutory maximum of $125,000,” Labor Commissioner James Craig wrote in his request to the governor and council.

Doherty underwent multiple surgeries after being shot seven times. He returned to work on Feb. 4, 2013. Myles Webster, who was convicted of shooting Doherty, is serving 60 years to life.

The Executive Council meets Wednesday at 10 a.m. at the State House.


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