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World Briefs: South Korea pushes to guarantee safety at Olympics


September 20. 2017 1:27AM


South Korea pushes to guarantee safety at Olympics

South Korea’s President Moon Jae-in said on Wednesday the country is pushing to ensure security at the upcoming Pyeongchang Olympic Games amid the escalating standoff over North Korea’s nuclear weapons programs.

During a meeting in New York with International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach, Moon said that South Korea has always hosted global sports events successfully despite being technically at war with the North, according to a South Korean presidential official.

Tillerson: Iran deal must be changed for U.S. to remain

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said on Tuesday the Iran nuclear agreement must be changed or the United States could not remain part of the pact.

Tillerson, in an interview on Fox News, said the so-called sunset clauses, under which some of the 2015 deal’s restrictions on Iran’s nuclear program expire over time, were of particular concern.

“If we’re going to stick with the Iran deal there has to be changes made to it. The sunset provisions simply is not a sensible way forward,” Tillerson said. “It’s just simply ... kicking the can down the road again for someone in the future to have to deal with.”

Egypt’s Sisi urges Palestinians to co-exist with Israelis

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi urged the Palestinians to overcome their differences and be ready to co-exist with each other and with Israelis in safety and security.

Following Egyptian-mediated reconciliation talks with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas' Western-backed Fatah faction, Islamist Hamas said on Sunday it would dissolve its "administrative committee" to enable the president's administration to retake control in the Gaza Strip.

Suu Kyi ignores Myanmar ethnic cleansing charges

Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi on Tuesday condemned rights abuses in Rakhine state and said violators would be punished, but she did not address U.N. accusations of ethnic cleansing, drawing cool international responses and calls for action to help minority Muslims.

Suu Kyi made the remarks in her first address to the nation since attacks by Rohingya Muslim insurgents on Aug. 25 led to a military response that has forced 421,000 Rohingya Muslims, more than half of them children, into neighboring Bangladesh.

Western diplomats and aid officials, hoping for an unequivocal condemnation of violence and hate speech, welcomed the tone of the Nobel Peace laureate’s message, but some doubted if she had done enough to deflect global criticism.

Long fetedas a champion of democracy in the Buddhist-majority country during years of military rule and house arrest, Suu Kyi has faced growing criticism for saying little about abuses faced by the Rohingya.

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