John Langdon

January 10. 2014 3:15PM

John Langdon - Portsmouth, New Hampshire 

John Langdon (1741-1819)
Elwyn Road
Portsmouth, NH

Marker Number: 127
Name and date established: Portsmouth 1978

Description: John Langdon, merchant and statesman, was born on June 26, 1741, on this farm, which was first settled by the Langdon family about 1650. With his brother Woodbury, he became a successful trader and shipbuilder. During the American Revolution, he supervised construction of the Continental warships Raleigh, Ranger, and America at his Portsmouth shipyard, was in active military service, and personally financed John Stark's expedition against Burgoyne in 1777. John Langdon had a long and distinguished career in public life, which included service in the New Hampshire House of Representatives, the New Hampshire Senate, and the Second Continental Congress. He became President of New Hampshire in 1785 and 1788, and was later elected Governor of the state six times, in 1805, 1806, 1807, 1808, 1810, and 1811. A close friend and advisor of Thomas Jefferson, John Langdon was a delegate of the Federal Constitutional Convention in 1787 and was elected the first president of the United States senate. The Governor John Langdon Mansion at 143 Pleasant St. in Portsmouth was listed on the National Register and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1974.

Location: Located at the State of New Hampshire Urban Forestry Center, on Elwyn Road, east of its intersection with Route 1.
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