Flume Gorge

May 22. 2013 5:00PM

 (photo: Dave Woodburn, 2010 UL Photo Contest Submis)
Franconia Notch State Park
Franconia, NH
Ph: 603-745-8391


The Flume Gorge is one of America's top ten most beautiful State Parks.

A natural chasm takes visitors from the Flume Visitor Center on wide gravel paths and wooden walkways through covered bridges, past waterfalls and through the 800-foot long gorge with its sheer 90-foot walls. Scenic pools, glacial boulders, and mountain views. Free 15-minute movie at the Information Center provides an introduction to Franconia Notch State Park.

Discovered in 1808, the Flume is a natural gorge extending 800 feet at the base of Mt. Liberty. The walls of Conway granite rise perpendicularly to a height of 70 to 90 feet and are from 12 to 20 feet apart. Bus service is provided to transport visitors to within 500 yards of the gorge entrance. Marked walking trails with signs explaining natural features lead to other points of interest, including the Pool and Sentinel Pine Bridge.

The contemporary visitor center, framed by a spectacular vista of Mts. Liberty and Flume, houses the Flume ticket office, an information center, cafeteria, gift shop, the state park system's historic Concord Coach, and a small auditorium where notch video programs are shown on a regular basis.

Open early May to late October

Franconia Notch State Park



White Mountains

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