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Statewide Granite Shield roundup nets 151 arrests, police say


February 16. 2018 12:14PM
Arrested in Keene Thursday as part of Operation Granite Shield were top, from left, Andrew Hammond, Susan Eggert and Justin Wunschel and bottom, from left, Katherine Cady, Kimberly Bader and Jay Washington. 



CONCORD — Enough heroin/fentanyl to keep 18,000 addicts happy.

One hundred fifty-one people in handcuffs.

And a BMW with a customized, hydraulically accessed compartment to stash drugs and money.

Those were some of the results of an all-day, statewide sweep on Thursday that involved 88 law enforcement agencies and state police from surrounding states, authorities said Friday.

Authorities announced the results during a press conference on Friday. The effort was so intense that police used the Emergency Operations Center, usually activated for natural disasters, to coordinate the operations, said New Hampshire State Police Capt. John Encarnacao.

Police will now use the arrests to start working back to the source, said Encarnacao, who oversees investigations for State Police.

“In this group of people there were no upper-level drug dealers taken into custody. There were obviously significant individuals in the chain that were arrested, Encarnacao said.

Also seized:

• 24 weapons, including 12 firearms in a single raid.

• 551 grams of heroin or fentanyl, which amounts to about 18,000 doses.

• 1,147 grams of cocaine and 81 grams of crack-cocaine.

• 141 Oxycodone pills and 115 grams of MDMA, also known as Ecstasy.

• $37,251 in cash.

Encarnacao said the arrests do not involve a single enterprise. The investigations were coordinated by 14 organizations such as Manchester police and the Rockingham County Sheriff's Office, which received Operation Granite Shield grant money.

He said the investigation found that people from smaller communities traveled to cities such as Manchester and Nashua to purchase large quantities of drugs and then returned to their smaller communities to sell them.

Many of them are addicts themselves, who support their habit by selling drugs, he said.

mhayward@unionleader.com


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