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It's been a deadly year on New Hampshire's roadways

By TODD FEATHERS
New Hampshire Union Leader

September 03. 2018 12:59AM
A Massachusetts man was pronounced dead at the scene of this crash on I-93 in Londonderry on Aug. 24. (Jeffrey Hastings)



As police patrol highways full of families heading to and from Labor Day destinations, New Hampshire is already experiencing a particularly deadly year on its roadways.

There had been 80 fatal crashes in the state as of Thursday, causing 89 deaths, according to the Department of Motor Vehicles.

There were 102 deaths from fatal crashes in 2017, 136 deaths from 130 crashes in 2016, 114 deaths from 103 crashes in 2015, and 95 deaths from 89 crashes in 2014.

"It's part of a national trend," said Dan Goodman, a public affairs manager at AAA Northern New England. "We're continuing to see an increase in fatal crashes and crashes involving serious bodily injury. It continues to be speed and impaired driving, and now distracted driving is in there, too."

Fatal crashes last month across the Granite State include:

. On Wednesday, Katelyn Sylvester-Cushing was killed in a head-on crash when her SUV crossed the center line on Route 9 in Chesterfield, striking another vehicle. The driver of that car was seriously injured and has undergone numerous surgeries, according to police.

. On Tuesday, Tiana Lozzi, 20, of Lynn, Mass., was killed in a head-on crash on Route 11 in Gilford, which resulted in a negligent homicide DWI charge being lodged against a 47-year-old Lakes Region man.

. On Aug. 13, Joshua Dunlap lost control of his Jeep on Old Westport Road in Winchester and died after being ejected from the vehicle.

And a single-car crash in Hampton Falls on Aug. 4 resulted in the deaths of four young adults, leaving behind several children.

Goodman said AAA Northern New England is expecting a record number of drivers this weekend and state police on Thursday urged drivers to think ahead before heading to Labor Day festivities that may involve drinking.

Ensure that you have a sober ride home or access to a taxi or public transportation before consuming alcohol, the agency said in a statement, and call 911 if you see anyone who appears to be driving drunk.


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