There’s a retirement boom going on. In the third quarter of 2020, about 28.6 million baby boomers born between 1946 and 1964 said they’d retired. That’s 3.2 million more boomers than retired in the same quarter of 2019.

If that’s you — or soon to be you — it’s important to recognize retirement’s rough spots and access its pleasures. Those who go abruptly from working full-time to complete retirement are especially challenged, according to a study in Work, Aging and Retirement. But many seniors find a solution. By 2026, around 30% of the labor force will be made up of folks 65 to 74. Working can help you stay emotionally connected and mentally sharp. Interested? Go to www.aarp.org and search for “Top 25 Part-Time Jobs for Retirees.” Other smart moves:

• Joining clubs, taking classes, volunteering and strengthening relationships with grandkids and family provide a sense of purpose and enhance self-esteem. Staying socially connected to six people a month makes your RealAge at least two years younger.

• Getting 30-plus minutes of exercise and 10,000 steps daily enhances brain function, heart health and mood. At age 65, that makes your RealAge 4.8 years younger. But after age 65, if three major stressful events (retirement? death of a spouse? moving?) go unchecked (try counseling and meditation) that adds 30 years to your RealAge!

• Genes account for about 33% of your chance of living to be 85. It’s healthy behaviors that make the difference, and it’s never too late to make them part of your life.

Mehmet Oz, M.D., is host of “The Dr. Oz Show,” and Mike Roizen, M.D., is chief wellness officer emeritus at Cleveland Clinic. To live your healthiest, tune into “The Dr. Oz Show” or visit www.sharecare.com.