Fall River Mayor Jasiel Correia II has been arrested, accused of extorting marijuana vendors for hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribe payments and other items, like a “Batman” Rolex watch, officials said Friday morning.

Four others have also been charged, including Genoveva Andrade, the former chief of staff for Correia, according to the FBI and U.S. Attorney’s office in Massachusetts.

“Within months of becoming mayor in January 2016, Correia began monetizing his official position to fund his lavish lifestyle and mounting legal bills,” reads a federal indictment unsealed Friday.

The indictment accuses Correia of using his office to extort at least four marijuana vendors for hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribe payments; extorting a building owner for cash and a “Batman” Rolex watch in exchange for permits and excavating work to activate the water supply to a commercial building, among other things; and to “corruptly demand” that his chief of staff give him half of her salary and almost all of a $10,000 “snow stipend” in return for appointing her and allowing her to keep her job.

“Despite Mayor Correia’s public assurances to the city of Fall River, based on the indictment, he has essentially run that town as a pay to play institution,” U.S. Attorney for Massachusetts Andrew Lelling said at a press conference, noting that Correia’s alleged scheme ran from 2016 to 2018 and payments totaled about $600,000.

Correia was first arrested last year on federal charges after authorities said he stole money from investors with SnoOwl, an app company he founded. Authorities said he used investor money to buy a Mercedes and fund trips to casinos, among other activities.

Correia, a Democrat, is currently up for re-election, with the city’s primary election on Sept. 17.

The 27-year-old mayor now faces charges including wire fraud, extortion conspiracy, and bribery.

Medical marijuana became legal in Massachusetts in 2012 and recreational marijuana was legalized four years later. State law requires marijuana businesses to obtain a letter of non-opposition from a municipality in order to open. Host community agreements are also required.

“Because non-opposition letters were essential to marijuana vendors, the competition for them amongst applicants seeking to operate marijuana businesses was substantial,” reads the indictment.

Correia has issued at least 14 non-opposition letters for marijuana businesses in Fall River, including two for his girlfriend’s brother, according to the indictment, to which Correia allegedly said, “nobody’s getting a special deal, a special anything.”

On Aug. 12, the Fall River City Council passed an ordinance to limit the number of marijuana licenses in the city.

In a letter dated Aug. 19, Correia vetoed the order, claiming it could expose the city to future litigation, eliminate competition and artificially inflate the value of licenses already issued. Correia also said a proponent of the ordinance had a conflict of interest, according to the indictment.

Andrade was Correia’s campaign manager. When he became mayor, she served as his chief of staff from November 2017 through December 2018 with a salary of $78,780 per year, the indictment reads.

Between December 2017 and July 2018, Andrade gave Correia about $22,800 including parts of her salary and the “snow stipend,” according to an indictment against Andrade.

In January, she stepped down to run Correia’s March recall election campaign.

Correia was recalled and re-elected in one day.