Stolen yarn returned

Brookline-based A Hundred Ravens lost its entire inventory of high-end yarn at a Texas knitting show, but got much of it back thanks to a Texas woman who saw some of the stolen yarn in a thrift store.

BROOKLINE — After a trailer full of yarn was stolen at a Texas convention, the proprietors at Brookline’s A Hundred Ravens thought they were in serious trouble.

“In it was almost all our inventory, all our samples, display gear, flooring, register ... everything,” Becca Purdin wrote on A Hundred Ravens’ Facebook page.

A Hundred Ravens is an independent, hand-dyed yarn company based in Brookline, operated by Purdin and Rachel Henry. The company went out to the DFW Fiberfest, a convention for crocheters, knitters, and spinners, earlier this month. It was there that their trailer was stolen from a hotel parking lot.

Luckily, a knitting grandmother working at a thrift store in Dallas spotted something that didn’t seem to belong: Amy Glover saw boxes full of luxury yarns inside the Dallas Habitat for Humanity home improvement thrift store. In all, there were more than 1,000 skeins.

Glover, according to WFAA television news in Dallas, confronted the manager about the expensive yarn; he said it had been donated that morning. The yarn sells for up to $35 a coil, and the manager told Glover two men donated half a trailer’s worth to the store.

Purdin had decided to leave the show early, given she had no inventory. She was on her way back to New Hampshire when she got a call about the recovered yarn.

“We were headed out of town … to make the long drive home, just about to stop for a bite, when we got a call (from Glover),” Purdin wrote on Facebook. “‘Are you A Hundred Ravens? I have 1,120 skeins of your yarn that were donated to the Habitat for Humanity ReStore in Dallas. Do you think this is your stolen yarn?’”

Purdin said they were able to recover about a third of the stolen yarn, and they went back to the DFW Fiberfest to finish out the show. “The other amazing vendors at (the show) cobbled a booth together for us ... and we decided to stay and do the last (two) days of the show,” Purdin said.