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USS West Virginia (foreground) is afire forward, immediately after the Japanese air attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. USS Tennessee is on the sunken battleship’s opposite side.

USS West Virginia (foreground) is afire forward, immediately after the Japanese air attackon Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. USS Tennessee is on the sunken battleship’s opposite side.

PEARL HARBOR, HawaiiThe Pearl Harbor Visitors Bureau has the task of ensuring the attack that brought the United States into World War II does not slip away from the history books.

“Memorials, commemorations, museum galleries — they all work together to help us remember that devastating day in 1941, the moment in American history that was pegged as a ‘Date which will live in infamy,’” the bureau states on its website.

The bureau notes on the website, visitpearlharbor.org, that the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument serves as one of the most complete collections of Pearl Harbor information and artifacts.

Visitors can walk through the exhibits, stand over the wreckage of the USS Arizona and hear of the horrors seen and heard that Sunday morning, so the story of Pearl Harbor has a good chance to be passed down and survive the test of time.

Through a series of exhibit galleries, museums and memorials, the monument retells the events of that morning, detailing the lead-up to the attack, the losses incurred and the aftermath that rocked the nation and had a part in changing the world.

Many members of the country’s armed forces found themselves under enemy fire on the morning of Dec. 7.

“We’ve all heard the adage, ‘Those who do not learn history are doomed to repeat it,’ and it’s a major factor in the urgency of Pearl Harbor remembrance,” the bureau states. “The attack on Pearl Harbor, a surprise assault masterminded and carried out by the Japanese, taught us to be vigilant as a country. Signs that an attack from the west was imminent were there, and many believe we did not do all we could have to prevent it from happening.”

Today marks the 77th anniversary of the attack. The bureau asks: Where could we have been more diligent? Were there signs that were ignored? Was it possibly just a lack of the proper technology or information?

It says that the answers to these questions may hold the key to preventing another attack, and those answers may still be hidden within the history of Pearl Harbor.

Through a series of exhibit galleries, museums and memorials, the monument retells the events of that morning that changed the world.