Coronavirus

State health officials released more details Tuesday about the New Hampshire child who died of COVID-19 in early September.

Officials with the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) said the child, who died the week of Sept. 6, was a boy from Hillsborough County 9 years of age or younger. The child died in another state, DHHS said.

COVID-19 is listed as the boy’s cause of death on the finalized death certificate, according to officials.

The child was included as one of six people who died of COVID-19 over two weeks ago, whose deaths have been recently confirmed as being related to the coronavirus.

Vaccines were approved for children ages 12 to 15 years old in May, but children ages 5 to 11 were unable to get the vaccine until last month.

Between 25% to 30% of all new COVID-19 infections in New Hampshire involve individuals under the age of 18.

“Everybody 5 years of age or older should get vaccinated to protect themselves and others from COVID-19, and everybody 16 years of age or older who has already completed a primary vaccination series should get a booster dose to have the highest level of protection,” DHHS said in a release.

Information on where to get vaccinated in New Hampshire is available at vaccines.nh.gov.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children’s Hospital Association (AAPCHA), as of Dec. 16 almost 7.4 million children have tested positive for COVID-19 since the onset of the pandemic. COVID cases among children are extremely high, with nearly 170,000 child cases added the past week, an increase of nearly 28% over the last two weeks.

DHHS also announced 19 new COVID-19 deaths on Tuesday. Five of the 19 victims were under the age of 60, DHHS said.

The number of active cases has dropped by 533 to 7,971, the first time the total has dropped below 8,000 since Nov. 30, when the total was 7,547.

The number of active hospitalizations is up one to 437.

Overall, 653 new cases were reported. There have been 187,340 cases of COVID-19 in New Hampshire since the pandemic began in early 2020.