Intersection Conflict Warning Systems

State transportation officials want to know what the public thinks of several intersection warning systems it plans to install later this month.

State transportation officials want to know what the public thinks of several intersection warning systems it plans to install later this month.

The Intersection Conflict Warning Systems (ICWS) are being installed at three locations — on Route 38 in Pelham, the intersection of Routes 9 and 63 in Chesterfield, and the intersection of Routes 101 and 123 in Peterborough.

The New Hampshire Department of Transportation (NH DOT) is targeting rural intersections it feels don’t require traffic lights, but have a history of crashes and poor sightlines.

“There is currently an unacceptable number of crashes at New Hampshire’s rural intersections. ICWS are critical for improving roadway user safety,” state traffic engineer Bill Lambert said.

The warning systems use flashing lights to warn drivers on a major road that a vehicle is approaching the intersection from a minor road.

“Research has shown that [Intersection Conflict Warning Systems] devices can reduce the number of crashes at intersections that do not warrant signalization, and at a lesser cost than signalization,” the department said in a news release. “They are used primarily at rural intersections and provide warnings to drivers that another driver could be entering or crossing the road they are on.”

NH DOT will evaluate the sites through a three-year pilot program to determine if the systems are reliable and effective.

State officials are asking for public feedback through a brief survey, available at surveymonkey.com/r/55SSSZM.

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