Vets Home marking two holidays

TILTON — The New Hampshire Veterans Home, 139 Winter St., will conduct two free public ceremonies this month, one to thank and honor all those who served their country in the armed forces, and one to pay tribute to those who gave their lives in service to America. Both begin at 11 a.m. and will be preceded by a coffee social and meet-and-greet time at 10:15 a.m.

On Saturday, May 18, all those who have served will be recognized at an Armed Forces Day ceremony. The speaker is Army Capt. Craig Sanderson, executive officer for New Hampshire Adjutant General David Mikolaities.

Then on Tuesday, May 28, those who made the ultimate sacrifice for the country will be honored in a Memorial Day service that will include a reading of names of NHVH residents who have passed away over the year. The speaker is Air Force veteran Alfred Montoya, Manchester VA Medical Center director. The ceremonies will take place in the Town Hall auditorium of the Home, located at 139 Winter St., Tilton.

The date of the Memorial Day event was chosen to avoid conflicts. The Home will transport buses of its residents to the New Hampshire State Veterans Cemetery in nearby Boscawen for the large public Memorial Day ceremony there on May 30.

Museum screening ‘Flying Fleet’

LONDONDERRY — “The Flying Fleet” (1929) will be screened with live music Thursday, May 23, at 7 p.m. at the Aviation Museum of New Hampshire, 27 Navigator Way. Admission is $20 per person, and $15 per member. The screening is a fundraiser for the Aviation Museum’s partnership with the Manchester School of Technology that expects to enable students to build an actual airplane in the 2019-20 school year.Get in the spirit of Memorial Day weekend with a vintage silent film about U.S. naval aviators, a window into what it was like to serve between the World Wars.

“The Flying Fleet” (1929), an MGM drama filmed at U.S. Naval bases, will be screened Thursday, May 23, at 7 p.m. at the Aviation Museum of New Hampshire, located at 27 Navigator Road in Londonderry.

The movie, made with the cooperation of the U.S. Navy and filled with scenes of vintage air and seaplanes in action, will be shown with live music provided by silent film accompanist Jeff Rapsis.

Admission costs $20 per person. The cost is $15 for Aviation Museum members.

The screening is a fundraiser for the Aviation Museum’s partnership with the Manchester School of Technology that expects to enable students to build an actual airplane in the 2019-20 school year.

“As we approach Memorial Day weekend, this is a terrific way to remember those who served by looking back at what it was like for the generation between the two World Wars,” Rapsis said.

Starring Ramon Novarro, “The Flying Fleet” follows the story of six graduates of the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis who make a solemn pact to all become Navy pilots.

The film follows the cadets through training with scenes filmed at bases in San Diego and in Pensacola, Fla. Scenes were also filmed aboard the USS Langley, the nation’s first aircraft carrier. The Langley, an aging coal transport ship, was outfitted with an enormous upper-level deck in 1922.

But it’s not just airplanes and ships. In “The Flying Fleet,” two of pilots fall for the same gal (Anita Page) off base, causing a rivalry that plays out in dramatic plot twists and action both on the ground and in the air.

A highlight of “The Flying Fleet” is an appearance of “The Three Sea Hawks,” a famous aerobatic team of the era. Drawn from a U.S. Navy squadron at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, the team used three Boeing F2B-1 and F2B-2 fighters. Its first demonstration in January 1928 at San Francisco gave rise to a popular nickname: “Suicide Trio.”

A note appears in the opening credits of the film: “Dedicated to the officers and men of NAVAL AVIATION whose splendid co-operation made this production possible.” The film was the first major Hollywood production to use Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego.

Popcorn and drinks will be available for purchase.