Northfield Drive-in

The Northfield Drive-in movie theater, which straddles the Massachusetts-New Hampshire border on Route 63, showed its first movie on Aug. 3, 1948.

NORTHFIELD, Mass. — On second thought, let us go on to the Northfield Drive-In, it is a silly place.

Northfield Drive-In, an open-air theater straddling the Massachusetts-New Hampshire state line, opens Friday, June 19, showing the classic “Monty Python And The Holy Grail” at 8:45 p.m. Friday. The movie also runs Saturday and Sunday.

Tickets are $10 for adults and $4 for children under 12 — and one need not answer the old man’s questions to avoid falling screaming in the crevasse below, or weigh a woman against a duck to see if she’s a witch, like in the famed comedy movie.

Drive-in movies are all the rage with indoor theaters closed due to the coronavirus pandemic. At Northfield, the new owners have added touchless concession ordering and more restrooms.

Spectators will have to stay in — or very near — their cars.

Julia and Steve Wiggin bought the 15-acre theater property from owner Mitchell Shakour on April 17 for $349,000.

Julia Wiggin said she wanted the first movie to be a comedy — and that’s what they got.

Running an old movie is a necessity, as Hollywood is holding back new releases with most theaters closed.

Built by former Buckland resident Carl H. Nilman, who owned a chain of drive-in theaters in New Hampshire and Massachusetts, the Northfield Drive-In is one of the oldest of its kind in the country. The theater showed its first movie on Aug.3, 1948: “Thunder in the Valley,” which was also known as “Bob: Son of Battle”.

The drive-in has also, or plans to host, high school graduations and a Girl Scout recognition event because the pandemic has made indoor ceremonies impossible.