This is New Hampshire Audubon’s Rare Bird Alert for Monday, Oct. 28.

A lazuli bunting was photographed at a birdfeeder in Bow on Oct. 22 and 23, but has not been relocated.

Four redheads were seen on Eel Pond in Rye on Oct. 26, and one was seen on Post Pond in Lyme on the 25th.

A pomarine jaeger was seen in offshore waters on Oct. 25, and six laughing gulls were seen along the coast in Rye on the 23rd.

Two sandhill cranes continue to be seen foraging in fields along Ledge Farm Road in Nottingham and were last reported on Oct. 21.

A trumpeter swan was discovered at N.H. Audubon’s Abe Emerson Marsh in Candia on April 13 and continues being seen. It was last reported on Oct. 25.

An immature red-headed woodpecker was discovered along North River Road near Burley Farm in Epping on Oct. 5, and was last reported on the 28th.

Two long-billed dowitchers, a stilt sandpiper, and two lesser yellowlegs were seen at Meadow Pond in Hampton on Oct. 26.

A willet (western subspecies) was seen in Rye on Oct. 26.

Two American golden-plovers were seen at the Exeter Wastewater Treatment Plant on Oct. 26 and 27.

Two lesser yellowlegs were seen at Pickering Ponds in Rochester on Oct. 28.

Seven great egrets were tallied along the coast on Oct. 26.

Two red crossbills were reported from Chatham on Oct. 24.

A dickcissel was seen at the Concord Community Gardens on Birch Street on Oct. 26.

A Lapland longspur was seen at Rye Harbor on Oct. 27.

A black vulture was seen in Westmoreland on Oct. 23.

A golden eagle was reported from Pack Monadnock in Peterborough on Oct. 22.

Raptor migration is under way with migrating raptors being counted daily at the Pack Monadnock Raptor Migration Observatory in Peterborough. Over 10,160 raptors, mainly broad-winged hawks, have already been tallied there since Sept. 1. The Carter Hill Raptor Migration Observatory in Concord is now being staffed by volunteers for a few days each week and has tallied over 2,374 raptors since Sept. 1. Be sure to visit these observatories during the fall season to help out with their counts.

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This listing can be seen in its entirety at www.nhaudubon.org.