New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner knows a thing or two about election law. His concern over a Democratic bill now before the U.S. Senate (and supported by Sens. Jeanne Shaheen and Maggie Hassan) is legitimate.

Gardner not only objects to it dictating to the states. He knows that the bill is an open invitation to further interference with state law, including the one about a little thing called the New Hampshire first-in-the-nation primary.

Hassan and Shaheen scoffed at Gardner, ignoring the “For the People Act” itself and instead noting that it doesn’t specifically reference our primary. They and Reps. Chris Pappas and Annie Kuster (who both backed the bill in the House) apparently were caught flat-footed by Gardner’s warning.

But the New Hampshire delegation has a primary concern that may be even more of a threat. In a political party that measures everything through quotas, colors, and percentages, our primary faces outright cancellation. Like first-caucus state Iowa, New Hampshire isn’t “diverse” enough, our large voter turnouts and willingness to hear of issues and from long-shot candidates notwithstanding.

There will be hell to pay for our all-Democrat delegation if it manages to let the primary slip away. Particularly in an evenly-divided Senate, Shaheen and Hassan ought to be capable of ensuring protection for the New Hampshire primary.

Sunday, April 18, 2021

Manchester’s mayor, as mayors are wont to do in an election year, was tossing out all manner of ideas last week. We have no quarrel with that. It is good to hear new ideas, and Mayor Joyce Craig says she wants to hear from the public about the $44 million that has fallen in the city’s lap un…

Judging from the official notifications from New Hampshire’s very own Office of Homeland Security last week, along with robocalls from power companies telling us to charge our batteries or head for higher ground, one would think that New Hampshire has never before had to deal with snow in April.

Friday, April 16, 2021

A Dartmouth college student who wants to become a member of the town select board has a bit of a problem. He will be returning to his home state this summer, when the election will be held.

Wednesday, April 14, 2021

What does it say about New Hampshire government priorities that it adds a new and unnecessary office (see related editorial today) but can’t provide its Site Evaluation Committee with someone to open the mail and inform the public about public hearings?

How on earth does Fidelity Investments intend to add 475 jobs in New Hampshire without the assistance of the state’s new Office of Outdoor Recreation Development? Or is the company, which is hiring 4,000 people nationwide, relying on this latest government office to reel in recruits?

Sunday, April 11, 2021
Friday, April 09, 2021

This week’s arrests in connection with the former Youth Development Center in Manchester should have no bearing on the future of the John H. Sununu Youth Services Center, its contemporary. The allegations are of sexual abuse from decades ago. More power to Deputy Attorney General Jane Young …

Merrimack voters have an election to decide this coming Tuesday, April 13. They lost a fine House representative in December with the sudden death of Dick Hinch. Hinch was a steady and reliable citizen politician. His loss weighed heavily not just on Merrimack but on the Republican Party as …

Wednesday, April 07, 2021

Pembroke Academy’s athletic director no doubt has the right to dismiss his track and field coach for refusing to follow official protocols regarding mask-wearing by spring track and field athletes. If competing schools are following the mask rules, a maskless Pembroke team might have an adva…

The Wall Street Journal did a superb job of calling out President Joe Biden for his hypocrisy regarding changes to state voting law in Georgia — unless, of course, Biden intends to also have America boycott the next summer Olympics in Communist China.

Sunday, April 04, 2021

New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner knows a thing or two about election law. His concern over a Democratic bill now before the U.S. Senate (and supported by Sens. Jeanne Shaheen and Maggie Hassan) is legitimate.