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Sen. Amy Klobiuchar (D-Minn.) speaks at a meeting with reporters and editors at the New Hampshire Union Leader in Manchester on Jan. 7.

If you are a New Hampshire voter who thinks Donald Trump is doing a good job, you can probably sleep in on primary day, Feb. 11. Try as they might, his Republican challengers have not made a dent in the President’s popularity within the party here.

If you are an independent or Democrat, however, yours may be one of the most consequential votes ever cast in a New Hampshire Primary. If there is to be any realistic challenge to Trump in November, the Democratic nominee needs to have a proven and substantial record of accomplishment across party lines, an ability to unite rather than divide, and the strength and stamina to go toe-to-toe with the Tweeter-in-Chief.

That would be U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota. She is sharp and witty, with a commanding understanding of both history and the inner workings of Capitol Hill.

Trump doesn’t want to face her. He is hoping for Bernie, Biden, Buttigieg or Warren. Each has weaknesses, whether of age, inexperience or a far-left agenda that thrills some liberals but is ripe for exploitation in a mainstream general election.

Sen. Klobuchar has none of those weaknesses and the incumbent needs to be presented a challenger who is not easily dismissed. Her work in Washington has led to the passage of an impressive number of substantive bills, even as the partisan divide has deepened. In 2018 she won reelection, taking back dozens of conservative-leaning counties that had gone for Trump two years earlier, when Hillary Clinton barely beat him in Minnesota. In fact, Sen. Klobuchar, a former prosecutor, has never lost an election.

But can a woman be elected President? We say of course, the right woman can and should be. By choosing Amy Klobuchar, New Hampshire primary voters can go a long way to proving it.

Joe McQuaid,

Editor at Large

Brendan McQuaid,

Publisher

Monday, February 17, 2020
  • Updated

The existing Manchester school board will meet at Memorial High this Thursday night to review and possibly accept the Manchester Proud group’s plans. How a future school board will be constituted is the work of the new School District Charter Commission. And its nine members want to hear from you.

Sunday, February 16, 2020
  • Updated

Recently proposed New Hampshire legislation would toughen criminal sentences for drunk or drugged drivers in incidents in which someone dies. Emotional testimony at the bill’s hearing suggested that such a law might have prevented these deaths.

Friday, February 14, 2020

The Presidential Primary post-mortems have piled up like yesterday’s snow and ice and will soon melt away. Predictably, the national pundits have again learned little. They have gone right back to relying on national polls to tell us who has any chance to gain the Democratic nomination.

Wednesday, February 12, 2020

In addition to opposing Hillary Clinton in 2016, Donald Trump was favored by many Americans who simply cried “enough!” at the duplicitous and spendthrift ways of both Republicans and Democrats. Voters, it seems, were tired of being bought off with their own money.

Tuesday, February 11, 2020
Sunday, February 09, 2020
Wednesday, February 05, 2020
Monday, February 03, 2020