FOR THOSE who care about animals and who want to protect them from mistreatment, a silver lining of the pandemic was that it kept the Professional Bull Riders (PBR) tour away from Manchester for more than a year. Alas, the tour is returning for two shows at the SNHU Arena in October.

The New Hampshire Animal Rights League opposes bull riding and any other activity where animals are made to perform for our entertainment. Although the PBR refers to the bulls as “animal athletes” and claims that they were born to buck, the bulls, unlike their human riders, do not consent to be there.

Being a PBR bull means being hauled around the country in a trailer, prodded into stalls and chutes, and on performance nights subjected to “a rock concert environment, complete with pulsating music, and explosive pyrotechnics,” as promoters describe it.

In the arena, there are several observable indicators that the bulls experience fear and distress. These include increased “eye white,” which results when the upper eyelid lifts, as well as “diarrhea butt,” an excrement-stained backside.

On event night, life for the bulls goes from just unnatural to downright dangerous. Just before they are let loose into the arena, the flank strap around their mid-section is yanked tight, which aggravates them into bucking harder and over-extending their hind legs as they fight to throw off the rider.

Although portrayed as “beasts” who are impervious to pain, bulls are not machines and often get hurt right along with the riders. Veterinarian and former rodeo performer Peggy Larson explains, “Bucking straps and spurs can cause the bull to buck beyond his normal capacity, and his legs or back may thus be broken.”

The PBR claims to care about the wellbeing of the animals, and yet they subject them to risk of injury over and over again. “In the case of a severe injury, that can’t be repaired through surgery, a bull would be humanely euthanized,” their web site states.

When profitable bulls are worn out or injured so severely that they can no longer perform, they may be retired to life as sperm donors. This allows the industry to continue exploiting bulls for profit by selling their offspring, semen, or even frozen embryos created in vitro with their sperm. (Google “bucking bull semen and embryos” for an eye-opening look into the mindset of those who treat animals as commodities.)

Remarkably, despite the terrible risk to both the rider and animal, bull riding is marketed as family entertainment. These events may seem like harmless fun, but consider the message they send to both children and adults: it’s OK to dominate and control animals, to force them to perform for our entertainment, and to give little thought to their needs or imagine how they might be suffering.

A number of cities across the country have passed ordinances preventing the use of devices that force bulls and other rodeo animals to perform, including spurs and the flank strap. It is no accident that where these implements are prohibited, bull riding and rodeos disappear.

If you are interested in keeping bull riding out of New Hampshire, please reach out to the NH Animal Rights League. You can join the NH Animal Rights League outside the SNHU Arena on Friday, October 15, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. for a peaceful demonstration against bull riding.

James Glover, president of the New Hampshire Animal Rights League, lives in Raymond.

Sunday, November 21, 2021
Friday, November 19, 2021
Thursday, November 18, 2021
Wednesday, November 17, 2021

POLITICAL CORRECTNESS and multiculturalism have made America soft and made its citizens challenge and abandon the fundamentals of our democracy and nationalism. Instead of focusing on the uniting of our people and treating them as a group to be the pillar of America’s foundation, we dwell on…

Tuesday, November 16, 2021

NEW HAMPSHIRE senior living communities serve about 6,500 older residents with an average age of 85 at 138 locations across the state. These elderly grandparents, parents, veterans, and retirees are being left behind by the Biden Administration, which has made combatting the COVID pandemic a…

FOR THREE DECADES, politicians have talked about fixing our broken immigration system, but they haven’t really done anything about it. Now, Congress has the opportunity to include pathways to citizenship for Dreamers, Temporary Protected Status holders, farmworkers, and essential workers in …

Monday, November 15, 2021
Sunday, November 14, 2021
Friday, November 12, 2021