WE FIND ourselves in a perfect storm with multiple flashpoints: a once-in-a-lifetime pandemic and a centuries-old struggle for justice. One is a public health emergency that has lasted for months and promises many future challenges: COVID-19. The other is the most insidious, long-standing public health emergency that has lasted for hundreds of years: racism.

Current events underscore the seriousness of the situation. The novel coronavirus has laid bare the health disparities and disproportionate impact on people of color across the nation. The data also show the same disparities and inequities at play here in the Granite State.

A recent report issued by the New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute emphasized this. While non-Hispanic white residents make up 90 percent of the New Hampshire population, they constituted only 74 percent of identified COVID-19 infections. More than one in five hospitalizations were of someone who identified as something other than white. That is a stark example of disproportionate impact right here at home.

There is a hunger in this country and in our state to finally address these injustices. This has never been clearer than in the recent widespread protests following the murder of yet more unarmed Black Americans at the hands of law enforcement.

Yes, New Hampshire is still predominantly white, but our demographics are changing. If we want our state to prosper and to build a talented and vibrant workforce, we need to embrace this growing diversity and continue our efforts to make New Hampshire a welcoming place. Our state’s most respected demographers and economists agree.

But first, there’s an institution we must collectively tear down: structural racism. It’s the entrenched and rigged system designed to confer advantages on some, but not others. And it’s often hard to spot if you’re someone who has always benefited from that system. People of color have long experienced systemic barriers to economic opportunity and financial independence, employment, education, criminal justice, housing, and health care, while bearing the disproportionate share of surveillance, mistrust and fear — often with lethal results.

These inconvenient truths have led to statewide efforts to address the pandemic of structural racism, including the Advisory Council on Diversity and Inclusion, established more than two years ago in an effort to combat discrimination. More recently, a Commission on Law Enforcement Accountability, Community, and Transparency was formed to examine our state’s policing practices and develop recommendations for improving the relationship between law enforcement and the communities they serve.

In our respective roles as board members at the Endowment for Health, New Hampshire’s largest health foundation, we are particularly proud of leadership investments in programs for New Hampshire residents that examine racism, bias and privilege. We are also proud of the Race and Equity in New Hampshire Series. That work has spanned more than four years and has grown to include hundreds of Granite Staters from all backgrounds and walks of life. We’re working together to promote race and equity in the domains of civic engagement, criminal justice/law enforcement, economic development, education, government, and health.

Getting involved is important. But it’s not enough to be an ally who stands in solidarity with people of color as they do the work of fighting racism. We must all be anti-racist partners willing to take action and ask the uncomfortable questions right here in New Hampshire.

We must be willing to confront the shopkeeper who is unnecessarily following people of color in the store. We must insist our school districts teach our children a more complete history of our state and nation. We must call for community policing and de-escalation training. And, hard as it might be, we must call out the neighbor who makes racist comments. We have to speak the truth even when it ruffles feathers.

None of us can be healthy without a culture free from the lie of racial constructs. Every one of us suffers from the societal setbacks of racism, no matter our background. We all play a part in shaping a future for our state where differences among our people are welcomed and celebrated. A future where geography, circumstance or skin color do not define our well-being.

Mike Ostrowski of Antrim served as interim CEO at New Hampshire Center for Nonprofits and as president and CEO of Child and Family Services of New Hampshire. He currently chairs the Endowment for Health. John I. Snow III is president and managing director of Quabbin Capital and grew up in Amherst. He serves on the Board and Investment Committee of the Endowment for Health. He lives in WInchester, Mass.

Tuesday, February 23, 2021

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Monday, February 22, 2021

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Sunday, February 21, 2021

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Friday, February 19, 2021

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Thursday, February 18, 2021
Wednesday, February 17, 2021

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Tuesday, February 16, 2021
Monday, February 15, 2021

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