BOLTON, Mass. — Students aren’t the only ones who think summer break is a little too short. Some hockey players feel the same, although they’ll also admit that a brief offseason is pretty much their goal when they open training camp.

The Bruins marked the unofficial start of the 2019-20 season on Monday, when players under contract gathered with coaches, alumni and guests for the team’s annual golf outing at The International.

That meant many players who felt like they’d just said goodbye to their teammates were suddenly welcoming each other back.

“Short summer,” said defenseman John Moore. “But I know the guys are energized and hungry.”

The Bruins stretched last season all the way to the last possible date on the NHL calendar — June 12 — only to lose Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Final to the Blues at TD Garden. Besides dealing with the disappointment of falling short, many were faced for the first time with a short preparation period for the season ahead.

The Bruins are counting on veterans with past Cup Final experience — captain Zdeno Chara, Patrice Bergeron, David Krejci, Brad Marchand (all winners in 2011), and 2013 finalists Torey Krug and Tuukka Rask — to pull younger, still-disappointed teammates into the present.

Coach Bruce Cassidy also hopes those veterans are understanding when he tells them he wants them to take it slowly at the start of training camp, which begins on Thursday.

“I don’t think any of our veteran guys like to move that slow. I think they want to get after it,” said the coach, who underwent knee replacement surgery over the summer. “But common sense has to take over there. That conversation, I think, will be realistic.”

Some vets will have the decision made for them. Chara, who spent the summer recovering from jaw and elbow surgery, and Bergeron, who played through a groin injury during the Final, will probably be nursed through the start of camp.

“I think the best way to go at it is to take it slowly, and make sure you get ready for October instead of getting ready for the first day of camp,” said Bergeron, whose already shortened training time was further limited by a platelet rich plasma (PCP) injection to address the groin issue. “It’s how you build that up, and make sure you’re still feeling fully rested in January and February. I think that’s what you’ve got to aim for.”

Cassidy pointed to silver linings like a relatively small amount of roster turnover (forwards Noel Acciari and Marcus Johansson were the only significant free-agent departures) and an increase in evaluation time for young players, who’ll get the majority of ice time over the first three of six preseason games.

There are a couple of dark clouds, though: Defensemen Charlie McAvoy and Brandon Carlo remain unsigned, and won’t get to camp until they have new contracts. Combined with Moore (shoulder surgery) definitely missing the start of the season, and Kevan Miller (knee) uncertain of medical clearance by the Oct. 3 regular-season opener, there are holes on the blue line.

“That’s the business side of it,” Cassidy said of McAvoy and Carlo’s status. “I hope they both do well, get what they deserve, and after that, get in the lineup and get ready to go. ... I don’t think any coach will tell you, or even players, that they want guys to miss (training camp).”

The Bruins, who haven’t had to deal with contract issues since Krug and Reilly Smith missed part of camp in 2014, are philosophical and hopeful.

“We’d like to see those guys as soon as possible,” Bergeron said. “That being said, there’s things you can’t control, that being one of them.

“For us, it’s about whenever they show up, being ready to welcome them. At the same time, we’ll hope for the best. We have to concentrate on who we have, and making sure we’re still building and getting ready for another great season.”