NHL: Stanley Cup Playoffs-Carolina Hurricanes at Boston Bruins

Hurricanes defenseman Dougie Hamilton skates to the penalty box during the third period of Thursday’s Game 1 of the Eastern Conference finals.

Dougie Hamilton, former first-round draft choice of the Boston Bruins, reportedly asked for and was granted a trade out of town. He never publicly shared why he was unhappy in Boston.

Thursday night there was no doubting what made him unhappy at TD Garden. He was sent to the penalty box twice, first for roughing and then for interference. The roughing penalty against Joakim Nordstrom 2:41 into the third period came led to the go-ahead goal by Patrice Bergeron just 13 seconds later in the Bruins’ come-from-behind 5-2 victory over the Hurricanes in the opener of the Eastern Conference final best-of-seven series.

A few minutes later, Hamilton was sent to the box for interference.

“Well, I just watched both of them, so I didn’t agree with either, so not much else to say,” Hamilton said. “The game’s over now, and nothing we can do about it now.”

It was the Bruins’ second power-play goal in a span of 28 seconds. Marcus Johansson had tied it with a power-play goal just 15 seconds before the first penalty.

Momentum crusher?

“Yeah, for sure,” Hamilton said. “I think we were playing a, I guess, not bad game, but had the lead in the third and took some penalties and gave them the lead, so tough to come back from that.”

Hamilton said he was “not going to comment on the refs,” and then when asked if he thought the penalties were undisciplined or unfortunate said, “I don’t think they were penalties, so neither.”

He said he did not receive an explanation for the penalties. He said it was a tough way to lose a game the Hurricanes led, 2-1, heading into the third period.

“Yeah, for sure it stings,” Hamilton said. “Obviously, we know we can be better obviously, but it stings when you lose like that, for sure.”

The Bruins have the highest power-play percentage this postseason.

“Yeah, we know how good they are, obviously, a lot of talent out there, and we can’t take penalties,” Hamilton said. “That’s the biggest thing, and tonight we did, and it bit us in the butt.”

At one point, Hamilton and Chara were nose-to-nose, barking at each other.

“Just a hockey play, I think,” Hamilton said. “An old friend.”

The fans derisively chanted his name for his trips to the penalty box.

“I mean, I don’t really care,” Hamilton said. “I’ve been chanted. They’ve chanted my name before, so for me, it is what it is. Obviously, unfortunate that I was in the box and taking those penalties, and I mean, it’s playoff hockey. That’s what you expect.”

Hurricanes coach Rod Brind’Amour declined comment when asked about Hamilton’s penalties.

“There’s no point in commenting on that,” he said. “There were penalties both ways I thought. Some were called and not called, so I mean there’s no point in getting into the officiating.”

Hamilton was playing with extra intensity, but Brind’Amour was not critical of that.

“Well, he’s playing on the edge,” Brind’Amour said. “We all were. Not me, but the guys were. He was trying to be engaged and maybe took it too far. I haven’t even looked at (the penalties). I’m as frustrated as everybody on some of the calls, but again, I think we got to kill them. We take a penalty, we have to kill them and we didn’t do that.”

The coach agreed with Hamilton in terms of the deflating effect of the penalties.

“Well, it took all of the momentum out,” Brind’Amour said. “Six minutes right away killing penalties. We had a couple of good chances near the end, but didn’t execute very well on the 6-on-5 and it ended up in our net, and the game’s over at that point.”